English 10: Literary Journeys

Final Essay Packet for AQWF

Taken from: http://weheartit.com/entry/5287103

Taken from: http://weheartit.com/entry/5287103

Final Essay Guidelines

For your final essay you will be asked to write a 5 paragraph essay (1 inch margins, 12 point type, double- spaced). It will be an essay in which you develop an essential question and thesis statement from your study of the book, All Quiet on the Western Front. This essay is due on Tuesday, March 5th. You will hand in a printed essay, proofread, and edited with care.

You have been working on the skills to do this. You began this journey toward this paper many weeks ago with our study of thesis statements and What? How? Why? evidence paragraphs. These questioning and analytical writing practices are going to help you with your final essay on this novel.  And the final rule: be specific, be specific, be specific!

You will be developing your thesis statement from these themes that we have talked about in class.

Choose one area and develop your question and your thesis statement as you have done previously. If you want you can choose a statement that you have already started. Now is the time to refine and edit it to get it paper-ready!

Themes:

The Human Animal:

The Female Figure:

The Allegory of the Cave in AQWF:

Paul as poet and soldier:

Step One: Develop your Thesis Statement

Using your preferred brainstorming technique, figure out your essential question and 3 sub-questions that are related to your theme. Craft your main question and 3 sub-questions so that it creates a framework for your essay. You will be handing in these questions and the resulting thesis statement on Monday for review.

Step Two: Evidence Paragraphs and Topic Sentences

You will develop your subquestions into topic sentences. These 3 topic sentences will serve as the beginnings of your evidence paragraphs. These topic sentences will then inform how you bring textual evidence into the How? part of the What?How?Why? paragraph.

Step Three: Introduction and Conclusion Paragraphs

Introduction and Conclusion paragraphs are the bookends of your essay. They set-up the reader in the beginning and then remind and illuminate the reader further at the end. Some people like to write these paragraphs at the beginning of the writing process and others like to write these at the end once the evidence paragraphs have been thought through and written out. Those writing process decisions are up to you. But here are some guidelines for what to include in the introduction and conclusion paragraph and what NOT to include.

What to include in your introductory paragraph:

  • The Thesis Statement
  • Additional sentences that talk briefly about your 3 topic sentences. These should include keywords, but not a word for word copy of your topic sentences for your evidence paragraphs.
  • Sentences that get to the point of your essay.

What NOT to include in your introductory paragraph:

  • Plot Summary
  • General and vague sentences about the war and the history of the war.
  • No filler sentences about the author or about the book unless it specifically relates to your thesis.
  • The word, “I.”

 

What to include in your conclusion paragraph:

  • Restate your thesis statement in a different way.
  • A slightly new viewpoint of your argument that wasn’t stated in your introduction,
    a new spotlight of understanding.
  • Sentences that get to the point of what the reader should take away from your essay.

What NOT to include in your conclusion paragraph:

  • Plot Summary
  • General and vague sentences about the war and the history of the war.
  • No filler sentences about the author or about the book unless it specifically relates to your thesis.
  • The word, “I.”

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This article was written on 24 Feb 2013, and is filled under Homework Assignments, In Class.

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